39' SEA-EEL

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39' SEA-EEL

750.00

Design#984                    

SEA-EEL 39’

L.O.A 39’ x L.W.L 35' X Beam 10’ x Draft 12” x Displ. 12350Lbs. x Sail area 733 Sq/ft.

   11.89M.      10.67M.        3.05M.    305mm.                   5T602                    68 Sq/ft.

SHARPIE LINES AND SKIFF CONSTRUCTION FOR UNCOMMON SIMPLICITY.

STANDING HEADROOM AND ACCOMMODATION FOR LIVABILITY. 

SHALLOW DRAFT AND JUNK RIG FOR MANIABILITY.

DRG. NO. 984-01   SAIL PLAN.

DRG. NO. 984-02   ACCOMMODATION PLAN.

DRG. NO. 984-03   LINES PLAN. TABLE OF OFFSETS.

DRG. NO. 984-04   CONSTRUCTION PLAN.

DRG. NO. 984-05   MIDSHIP SECTION.

DRG. NO. 984-06   DECK PLAN.

DRG. NO. 984-07   MAST AND RIGGING PLAN.

DRG. NO. 984-08BILGEBOARD PLAN. 

DRG. NO.984-09  RUDDER PLAN. 

U.S$750.00. Buy.

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DESIGN # 984 SEA-EEL.    

She is the first design of what I would like to be series of shallow draft crafts.

Sea-Egret at 31 feet, Sea-Eider at 26’ and Sea-Eel at 39 feet.

For this Line of boats, I have the strong temptation to adopt a “build a box and put a lid on” approach. I am 

in good company when really good designers like Bolger andHunt have trail blazed the same path with 

"Box" boats.  Heavy rocker and raise of chine above the load waterline seems to be the Trademark.  Other 

designers have adopted the vertical and horizontal look for their sections.  Architects like Amiet, Barlow, 

Beckwith, Calkins, Chapelle, Clapham, Garden, Staempfli and others have explored the options for their 

"Flatties" and in particular, have chosen to start the chine line on the datum waterline.

 Let’s see aboutSea-Eel, the 39 footer.

 

THELINES.

They are dictated by my desire to present a fast boat of extreme shallow draft and of ease of construction. 

Sections at 90 degrees, flat bottom, straight bow and stern go a long way to achieve the result. Hard bilge at 

maximum depth and rocker in the profile will minimize the wetted surface. The bow, at any angle of heel 

will present a sharp V to the sea encounter. The stern will not drag the transom until 15 degrees of heel or 

so. The “beached” draft is 13”.

The static waterline is 35’ and the displacement is 12350 lbs. Consideration of trailer ability and standard 

size of available sheeting material determines the maximum beam of 10’.

 

THE CONSTRUCTION.

Any flat panel material can be used to build this boat with the exception of steel of course. The plan 

addresses plywood fabrication. The topsides are made of two panels cut to shape and the bottom is doubled 

in thickness. The bulkheads support the skin. They define the partition for the interior. Chine logs and sheer 

clamps strengthen the boat at the distance location of maximum inertia. Because the boat is meant to be 

driven ashore I would rather have a strong backbone rather than to rely only on fiberglass as in a stitch and 

glue structure. Hull and deck are fiber glassed with epoxy. The cabin is in character with the sharpie look. It 

just happens it is also easier to build that way. The centerboards are pivoting steel blades. The rudder is 

made of the same material and shows a pivoting board.

 

THE INTERIOR.

It offers full headroom inside the coachroof. The rest of the accommodation is straightforward and laid out 

for a couple to be reasonably happy together. A large double berth, hanging locker and a bureau form the 

aft part of the boat. A complete galley occupies the center. The comfort of having a place to stand up is not 

to be neglected and if there is a spot for it, it should be in the cooking area. The saloon features two seven 

feet settee berths on either side of a folding table. The head is placed amidships.

 

THE DECK.

Having no inboard engine cleared the interior. The outboard is on the transom astern of the rudder. There is 

a bridge deck, and the cockpit is minimized in size and volume. A hatch forward provides ventilation and 

access to a stowage area.

 

THE SAIL PLAN.

The interesting aspect of this design, from my point of view is, the adopted Junk rig.  I never paid too much 

attention to this sail plan configuration because I always associated it with inefficiency under sail. The 

battens are either too stiff or too flexible and bent the wrong way around the mast. Therefore the sails are 

essentially flat planes with poor drive on all point of sailing except downwind. But the Chinese rig offers 

the tremendous and unique characteristic that it can be entirely handled from the steering position. Set, 

reefed-in and out and furled. No deck work, no stopping the boat, no changing her course. The other 

advantage is that for a given height of spar, we can set more sail area than under any other kind of rig. And 

this is where I intend to get back some of the lost performance. Increase the sail surface. The flat 

spinnaker/jib forward also add dramatically to the total surface of sails.

 

THE CONCLUSION.

Sharpies and "Flatties" have been around for a long time. The originators along the Connecticut shores

were oystermen. It is in my view a good sign to see yachts developed from a working background, more

particularly where sailing was pursued in connection with hunting and fishing. A sharpie can be a full

substitute for regular yachts at less cost and draft.