40' Class 40

282RHP-12.jpg
282-5GAPL.jpg
282RHP-11.jpg
282RHP-13.JPG
282RHP-12.jpg
282-5GAPL.jpg
282RHP-11.jpg
282RHP-13.JPG

40' Class 40

0.00

Design#282. 

Class 40.

L.O.A 40’ x L.W.L 40’  x Beam 14’-9” x Draft9’-10”

  12.19M.       12.19M.             4.49M.           2.99M

Drawings are completed at the time of purchase to reflect latest developments.

Add To Cart

The Class 40 Tango, follows parameters set by the rule, to the maximum of all dimensions.

The result is a platform with a fine entry, wide beam and transom. The shallow Veed in the stern is carried all the way forward to the mid section at a constant angle to keep the buttocks as straight and flat as possible. A true chine boat. The lines are carried towards the bow in a deep and sharp section. The overall simplicity of the hull shape hides the reasons behind everything.

The twin outboard rudders, placed well to the sides are out of the wake exit and are perpendicular to the bottom angle. In case of hitting something, the rudders swing aft, thanks to a “fuse” line built into the system.

The keel is designed to carry all of its lead into the shape of the bulb, for maximum stability. The planform is designed to maximize the aspect ratio available with an optimized sweepback angle.

The sail plan represents an effort to place the mast as far aft as dictated by balancing the rig with the appendages.

The deck plan, reflects the need of sailing the boat single or double handed with the necessity of getting protection from the elements.

The Accommodation plan in its simplicity, offers a couple of options, within the same built for strength structure.

Explaining the chine.

One has to see a class 40 out of the water, to realize how large is the wetted surface. The adoption of circular sections aft reduces the surface for a given displacement. So, many of the 40's do not have a chine. If they do, most designers place it above the waterline. This minimizes the function of the chine in a hard chine boat. Like in a power boat, the chine helps to promulgate planning and it is with this in mind that I place the angle at a low position. The shallow "V" reduces the wetted surface in the stern in light air, and keeps the light helm light in stronger wind. The constant angle of the sections, from the middle of the boat to the transom, keeps the footprint of the boat into the water as small as possible.

Tango as designed and published is a flat out racer. Based on the "box" rule of the class 40. 

info@class40racing.com

Note: The purchase of the plans will benefit the latest trend and modifications required to be up to date in a competitive class in perpetual motion.